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Research

Our research

Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Knowledge transfer and exchange

ANROWS host activities as part of its knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) work, including public lectures, workshops and research launches. Details of upcoming ANROWS activities and news are available from the list on the right.

ANROWS

About ANROWS

ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Knowledge translation resources

To support the take-up of evidence, ANROWS offers a range of resources developed from research to support practitioners and policy-makers in delivering evidence-based interventions.


FACT SHEET

Pathways to intimate partner homicide

This fact sheet series explores three offender trajectories to intimate partner homicide identified in recent ANROWS-commissioned research, conducted by the Australian Institute of Criminology.

These summaries of the pathways to intimate partner homicide – the “fixated threat” pathway, the “persistent and disorderly pathway”, and the “deterioration/acute stressor pathway” – capture key features of each pathway, including offender characteristics, relationship dynamics, events occurring in the lead-up to the lethal incident, and the lethal incident itself, as well as offenders’ willingness to accept responsibility for their actions. The summaries also identify potential opportunities for intervention along each of the three pathways.

These resources provide crucial information for policymakers in terms of intervention opportunities, particularly when offenders are not already known to law enforcement – for example, if they are engaging primarily in non-physical coercive controlling behaviours – or are not showing established risk factors for IPH. They also draw attention to less obvious early intervention points: given the high rate of mental illness (68%) among offenders on the deterioration/acute stressor pathway, mental health professionals could be well placed to conduct risk assessments and identify increasing risk of IPH in the context of deteriorating mental health.

The full report, The “Pathways to intimate partner homicide” project: Key stages and events in male-perpetrated intimate partner homicide in Australia, is also available for download.

 

 

Suggested citations

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety. (2022). Pathways to intimate partner homicide: The “fixated threat” offender trajectory [Fact sheet]. ANROWS.

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety. (2022). Pathways to intimate partner homicide: The “persistent and disorderly” offender trajectory [Fact sheet]. ANROWS.

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety. (2022). Pathways to intimate partner homicide: The “deterioration/acute stressor” offender trajectory [Fact sheet]. ANROWS.

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