Feeling unsafe? Find support services   emergency? call 000

Research

Our research

Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

News and events

ANROWS hosts events as part of its knowledge transfer and exchange work, including public lectures, workshops and research launches. Details of upcoming ANROWS activities and news are available from the list on the right.

ANROWS

About ANROWS

ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Resources

To support the take-up of evidence, ANROWS offers a range of resources developed from research to support practitioners and policy-makers in delivering evidence-based interventions.


RESEARCH REPORT

Connecting the dots: Understanding the domestic and family violence experiences of children and young people with disability within and across sectors: Final report

Children with disability are known to experience violence at higher rates than children without disability. However, in-depth qualitative research with children, their families and practitioners has been missing from Australia’s national conversation on children with disability and domestic and family violence (DFV).

This report presents findings from Phase 2 of a larger project “Connecting the dots: Understanding the domestic and family violence experiences of children and young people with disability within and across sectors”. Phase 2 extends on the prevalence data captured in Phase 1 to develop a richer picture of the lives and needs of young victims and survivors, their families and the practitioners working with them across services.

To add this depth to the conversation, the research team spoke with 36 children and young people between eight and 20 years old, 14 family members and 46 practitioners working across disability, advocacy, DFV, health and family support services.

The research team found that children and young people with disability:

  • are first and foremost children with interests, humour, contributions and relationships
  • often know more about violence and safety than adults assume
  • can be destabilised, isolated and traumatised by violence.

Participants also identified what effective service delivery could look like, naming a number of attributes such as practitioner consistency, flexible use of supports and disability-informed practice.

Largely children, young people and families expressed that these characteristics were not replicated in the services they were receiving.

Overarchingly, the research found support seemed to be in place because of the initiative taken by key people in their lives (mothers, mainly). A significant amount of advocacy and persistence was needed, often over years, for most of the children and young people in this study to receive a reasonable level of support.

 

 

Publication details

This work is part of the ANROWS research reports series. ANROWS research reports are in-depth reports on empirical research produced under ANROWS’s Research Program.

 


 

Authors

PROFESSOR SALLY ROBINSON  
Disability and Community Inclusion, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University

PROFESSOR kylie valentine
Social Policy Research Centre, UNSW Sydney

DR AMY MARSHALL  
Disability and Community Inclusion, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University

JALA BURTON  
Disability and Community Inclusion, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR TIM MOORE  
Australian Centre for Child Protection, University of South Australia

PROFESSOR CHRIS BREBNER  
PVC Learning and Teaching, Flinders University

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR MELISSA O’DONNELL  
Australian Centre for Child Protection, University of South Australia

DR CIARA SMYTH  
Social Policy Research Centre, UNSW Sydney


ISBN: 978-1-922645-50-0 (print) | 978-1-922645-61-6 (online)

94 pp.


Suggested citation

Robinson, S., valentine, k., Marshall, A., Burton, J., Moore, T., Brebner, C., O’Donnell, M., & Smyth, C. (2022). Connecting the dots: Understanding the domestic and family violence experiences of children and young people with disability within and across sectors: Final report (Research report, 17/2022). ANROWS.

Back to top