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Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Knowledge transfer and exchange

ANROWS host activities as part of its knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) work, including public lectures, workshops and research launches. Details of upcoming ANROWS activities and news are available from the list on the right.

ANROWS

About ANROWS

ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Knowledge translation resources

To support the take-up of evidence, ANROWS offers a range of resources developed from research to support practitioners and policy-makers in delivering evidence-based interventions.

ANROWS Stakeholder Survey

Your views are important to us—we’d like to hear from you.

As a Notepad reader, you have valuable insight into the strengths and weaknesses of ANROWS’s resources. That’s why ANROWS is inviting you to complete our annual Stakeholder Survey.

Your response to the ANROWS Stakeholder Survey will help us understand who is using our resources and publications, how you are using them, and how we might improve the ways we communicate with you.

We are not collecting any personally identifying information—the data collected will be used in aggregated form to inform our future planning.

The survey will close at 11pm, Monday 15 June.

TAKE THE SURVEY

 


NEW PROJECT

Investigating the growing problem of technology-facilitated abuse

The use of technology to facilitate sexual abuse and violence against women is a rapidly growing and serious problem.

Australian data shows that there is increased cause for concern during COVID-19. For example, the Office of the eSafety Commissioner has recorded a 200 percent surge in image-based abuse over March and April (when compared to the 2019 monthly average).

There is an urgent need for rigorous and current evidence on the extent of the problem in Australia, which will inform policy-makers and enable them to develop an effective response.

ANROWS is today launching a new research project to investigate the extent and impacts of this kind of abuse in Australia.

The research aims to better understand the nature and characteristics of technology-facilitated abuse, and to establish reliable national prevalence rates for victimisation and perpetration, including online sexual harassment, stalking, partner violence and image-based sexual abuse.

The project is part of a program of research under the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010–2022 (funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services), and will be led by Associate Professor Asher Flynn from Monash University and Associate Professor Anastasia Powell from RMIT University.

FIND OUT MORE
NEW REPORT

Understanding complex trauma and women’s safety

“When you use the word illness, you’re saying that I’m sick. I’m not sick. I have a set of symptoms as a result of what was done to me. I’m not sick.”  [Louise, study participant]

New ANROWS research led by Associate Professor Michael Salter from UNSW Sydney, “A deep wound under my heart”: Constructions of complex trauma and implications for women’s wellbeing and safety from violence explores Australian policy and service responses for victims/survivors of gender-based violence who have experiences of complex trauma.

In Australia, one quarter of women subject to gendered violence report at least three different forms of interpersonal victimisation in their lifetime, such as child sexual abuse, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. Exposure to multiple, repeated forms of interpersonal victimisation may result in complex trauma, which involves a range of traumatic health problems and psychosocial challenges.

The report highlights the need for professional consensus and shared frameworks of practice to understand and address complex trauma.

“The women we interviewed told us that complex trauma is impacting every aspect of their lives: mental health, physical health, relationships, safety, financial security,” said Associate Professor Salter. “They flourished when services addressed all trauma impacts rather than just focusing on a single issue.”

The report highlighted the need for improved understandings of intergenerational trauma, and for responses to those with complex trauma to be sensitive, coordinated and consistent between services and agencies.

RESEARCH REPORT

“A deep wound under my heart”: Constructions of complex trauma and implications for women’s wellbeing and safety from violence

KEY FINDINGS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

Constructions of complex trauma and implications for women’s wellbeing and safety from violence: Key findings and future directions

WEBINAR

Working with women who have experienced complex trauma in mental health and refugee services – a comparative discussion


NEW REPORT

The role of multicultural and settlement services in the family violence system

Migrant and refugee women experience domestic and family violence at least as much as women in the wider population, and they face particular barriers to accessing the services that can help.

Multicultural and settlement services can offer a key avenue of contact with migrant and refugee women, who may engage with these services soon after their arrival in Australia.

Multicultural and settlement services supporting women experiencing violence: The MuSeS Project sought to identify how multicultural and settlement services can be better supported to assist women and children experiencing violence. The research was led by Associate Professor Cathy Vaughan at the University of Melbourne’s Gender and Women’s Health Unit, and conducted in partnership with the Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health  in Victoria.

Professor Vaughan said recently arrived women faced challenges including lack of multilingual information, inconsistent use of interpreters, fear of deportation and financial barriers.

The report found that the capacity of these services to respond is strengthened by staff training, organisational support structures, and community connectedness, but undermined by limited funding and service scope, and limited options for referral.

This report contributes to ANROWS’s growing body of evidence relating to migrant, refugee and culturally and linguistically diverse communities, and their experiences of domestic, family and sexual violence. Two recently published projects look at interventions with domestic and family violence perpetrators from refugee backgrounds and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Projects with Action Research, which focussed on the prevention of violence against women and creating safer pathways to crisis and support services.

RESEARCH REPORT

Multicultural and Settlement services Supporting women experiencing violence: The MuSeS Project

KEY FINDINGS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

Multicultural and Settlement services Supporting women experiencing violence: The MuSeS project. Key findings and future directions

WEBINAR

Strengthening capacity for multicultural and settlement services to support women experiencing violence

WEBINAR

Working with women who have experienced complex trauma in mental health and refugee services

1–2pm (AEST), Thursday, 18 June

Complex trauma is best understood as multiple, repeated forms of interpersonal victimisation resulting in traumatic health problems and psychosocial challenges.  Women with complex trauma have often experienced multiple forms of trauma in childhood, followed by revictimisation—including domestic and family violence and sexual assault—in adulthood.  This commonly occurs within a context of domestic and family violence.

Practitioners across all health and social sectors, including mental health and refugees services, frequently come into contact with women who have experienced complex trauma.  However, the term ‘complex trauma’ neither consistently nor well defined in policy or practice.

Drawing on findings from ANROWS research Constructions of complex trauma and implications for women’s wellbeing and safety from violence, this webinar will host a panel of researchers, practitioners and survivors with lived experience to discuss:

  • survivors’ and professionals’ understandings of complex trauma
  • how these different understandings impact practice and women’s experiences of services
  • trauma-informed care in mental health and refugee services.
REGISTER NOW

WEBINAR

Strengthening capacity for multicultural and settlement services to support women experiencing violence

3–4pm (AEST), Wednesday, 10 June 2020

Multicultural and settlement services provide a wide range of supports and programs to newly arrived migrants and refugees, and people from multicultural communities who are settled in Australia. These services regularly receive disclosures of, or otherwise become aware of domestic and family violence.

This webinar will unpack new ANROWS research, ‘Multicultural and settlement services supporting women experiencing violence: The MuSeS project’.  The expert panel of researchers and practitioners will discuss:

  • how multicultural and settlement services regularly encounter and respond to clients who are experiencing violence
  • the strengths and constraints impacting service provision
  • key recommendations of the research for policy and practice.

This webinar is designed for practitioners and policymakers working in refugee, migrant and settlement services, and domestic and family violence services.

REGISTER NOW

Opportunities

STOCKTAKE OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE PREVENTION INITIATIVES: SURVEY

The Australian Government Department of Social Services has engaged Deloitte to conduct a stocktake of sexual violence prevention initiatives in Australia. You are invited to participate in a survey to better understand and coordinate efforts to prevent sexual violence and harassment.

This survey will focus on information about the sexual violence and sexual harassment primary prevention initiatives at your organisation.


New resources and reports

Resources

Easy English guides: accessible information about technology-facilitated abuse and image-based abuse, as well as practical pathways to support—eSafety Office

Videos: Financial abuse, Financial literacy, Getting back on track after financial abuse & Overcoming money shame—Women’s Legal Service Qld

Webinar: Workplace Rights for Domestic Violence Leave–Women’s Legal Service NSW, 11am, Wednesday 1 July 2020

Books and reports

Dynamics of Family and Intimate Partner Violence.

Preventing Domestic Homicides: Lessons learned from tragedies. 

Intimate Partner Violence and the LGBT+ Community. 


Contribute to Notepad

If you have publications, resources, opportunities or events to promote, please forward them to enquiries@anrows.org.au.

Preferred format is a very brief outline (maximum 4 lines) and a link to further information.

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