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  • ABOUT

    The NCAS
    Report

    The NCAS tells us how people understand violence against women, their attitudes towards it, what influences their attitudes, and if there has been a change over time.

    The report

    The National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women and Gender Equality Survey.

    Download

  • Resources

    The 2017 NCAS

    A collection of resources to help assist in the communication of NCAS findings and messages.

    The report

    The National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women and Gender Equality Survey.

    Download

  • The 2017 NCAS findings are here!

    Go to the Summary

    Young Australians’ attitudes to violence against women and gender equality

    Go to the Summary

    Attitudes of people from non-main English-speaking countries

    Go to the Summary

    Attitudes towards violence against women and gender equality among Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders

    Download report
    Australians’ attitudes to violence against women and gender equality

    While Australians’ attitudes to violence against women and gender equality are improving, there are some concerning trends.

    Many people’s knowledge and attitudes to violence against women are out of step with the evidence, and with women’s experiences.

    It’s concerning that a substantial minority mistrust women’s reports of violence, and feel the problem of gender inequality is exaggerated. We need to do more to change these attitudes.

    Our attitudes to sexual consent are concerning. We need to focus on the abusive behaviour, not women’s choices.

    GO TO FINDINGS
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    NCAS

    What is NCAS

    The periodic National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women Survey, or NCAS, tells us how people understand violence against women, their attitudes towards it, what influences their attitudes, and if there has been a change over time. It also gauges attitudes to gender equality and people’s preparedness to intervene when witnessing violence or its precursors.


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    Download the NCAS summary report

    The National Community Attitudes towards Violence against Women and Gender Equality Survey


    Download
    #NCAS ON TWITTER

    Australia's Education Ministers have approved the National Action Plan!

    ANROWS is proud to collaborate with the Department of Education. Together, we're ensuring that our work is grounded in the latest evidence, to advance safety in higher education.

    Curious about the impact of financial education on women experiencing intimate partner violence?

    Dive into our Evidence Portal to explore our latest evaluation of this intervention initiative.

    Read here: https://evidenceportal.au/evidence/financial-education-programs-for-women-experiencing-intimate-partner-violence/

    2

    Economic hardship is one aspect of the complex challenges that can arise from domestic and family violence.

    ANROWS' Acting CEO, Jane Lloyd, shared her insights in an article with The @GuardianAus.

    Calling all change makers! ANROWS research grant applications closing Feb 11.

    The 2023 grants fueled impactful work by QATSICPP, collaborating with the Institute of Child Protection Studies, Daryl Higgins & Alex Cahill.

    Apply now: https://www.anrows.org.au/research-grants/apply-now/

    What does the evidence tell us about educating women in university about the risk of sexual violence? We have just released our latest intervention review on the ANROWS Evidence Portal.

    Check out our insights here:

    What does technology facilitated coercive control look like and how can practitioners, both face-to-face and working via telehealth, support victim-survivors?  
       
    You can learn more via the rerun of this @aifs_gov_au webinar. 
      
    Register now ⏬️
    https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1755157444309096279

    In 2024, understanding coercive control in an era of criminalisation is crucial. Check out this article by @Kate_FitzGibbon, @ellenreeves110, @SilkeMeyer_DFV, and @SandraWalklate featuring insights from 54 Australian women.
    📰 Read here:

    🌟The 2021 NCAS findings for young Australians can inform our work to end violence against women and children🌟

    After unpacking the findings from the 2021 NCAS, what’s next? Find out how to support young people as we aim to end violence in a generation: http://www.ncas.au

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    📖 "Migrant and refugee women in Australia: A study of sexual harassment in the workplace" (2023)

    46% had experienced sexual harassment in the workplace and many believed their race or religion were motivating factors for the harassment.

    Will a positive duty benefit all women, or just some?

    Prabha Nandagopal on racism and sexual harassment:

    “It’s an issue that comes up time and time again, and now, we have the research through ANROWS to back it up.”

    We can support young Australians by implementing initiatives that emphasise that consent must be active and ongoing and cannot be disregarded when people are under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.

    Learn more:

    Most young Australians recognise that consent must be active and ongoing.

    However, while most young respondents strongly disagreed that a man was justified in forcing sex, they tended to see rape as more justifiable if a woman had initiated kissing.