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Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

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ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

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To support the take-up of evidence, ANROWS offers a range of resources developed from research to support practitioners and policy-makers in delivering evidence-based interventions.


RESEARCH REPORT

Kungas’ trauma experiences and effects on behaviour in Central Australia

This report provides an opportunity for Aboriginal women who are clients of the Kunga Stopping Violence Program (KSVP) in the Alice Springs Correctional Centre to contribute to a deeper understanding of the life events that led to their incarceration.

The research explored the lives of 12 Aboriginal women who were clients of the KSVP, and were incarcerated for alleged violent offences in Central Australia. Analysis of their life stories leading up to their incarceration demonstrates the critical need for services that can effectively respond to the trauma of women’s lives and prevent future incarceration.

Further, the research also:

  • applied a trauma lens to the life stories of Aboriginal women in Central Australia who have been incarcerated
  • identified the interventions, services and supports that can divert women into programs to prevent incarceration
  • highlighted the need for a coordinated service response
  • identified service reforms required to meet the needs of Aboriginal women experiencing complex trauma.

The methodology used for this research privileges the voices of Aboriginal women. Dadirri—described as a deep listening process, of being fully present and aware—was used by the researchers in order to give the women greater control over what and how much detail they presented.

The report includes recommendations for policy and practice.

 

 

Publication details

This work is part of the ANROWS Research reports series. ANROWS Research reports (Horizons) are in-depth reports on empirical research produced under ANROWS’s research program.


Author

MIRIAM BEVIS
Kunga Stopping Violence Program Manager (NAAJA)

EMERITUS PROFESSOR JUDY ATKINSON
Patron/Elder Advisor (We Al-li)

DR LEISA McCARTHY
Research Development Coordinator, Menzies School of Health Research

DR MICHELLE SWEET
Senior Project Officer, Menzies School of Health Research


ISBN: 978-1-925925-25-8 (print) | 978-1-925925-26-5 (online)

75 pp.

 

Suggested citation

Bevis, M., Atkinson, J., McCarthy, L., & Sweet, M. (2020). Kungas’ trauma experiences and effects on behaviour in Central Australia (Research report, 03/2020). Sydney, NSW: ANROWS

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