Feeling unsafe? Find support services   emergency? call 000

Research

Our research

Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

News and events

ANROWS hosts events as part of its knowledge transfer and exchange work, including public lectures, workshops and research launches. Details of upcoming ANROWS activities and news are available from the list on the right.

ANROWS

About ANROWS

ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Resources

To support the take-up of evidence, ANROWS offers a range of resources developed from research to support practitioners and policy-makers in delivering evidence-based interventions.


EXTERNALLY FUNDED RESEARCH PROJECTS

Finding Metis

Background

"Finding Metis" is a research project on the lived experiences of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) women of coercive control, intimate abuse and family violence in Western Australia. The book will map the stories of resistance, survival, resilience and resourcefulness of victims and survivors of intimate abuse and violence and coercive control. This is an under-studied and -explored area within the current literature. Various research shows the need for greater cultural awareness in service providers as women from CALD communities continue to experience higher rates of intimate abuse and coercive control and more barriers to support services than non-CALD women.

Aim

The primary aim of the project is to bring together and present culturally diverse women’s stories, voices and lived experiences of resistance, survival and resilience through intimate abuse and family violence. The project aims to better inform how we as a community can create a safe environment for women and children regardless of their backgrounds. This study also has the potential to inform service providers, policymakers, educators and researchers who work in the field of intimate abuse and family and domestic violence so that they can better respond to the experiences and needs of women and families from CALD backgrounds.

Methods

The research methodology utilised is a qualitative narrative inquiry approach informed by a feminist research methodology. I will be conducting one-on-one, face-to-face interviews with around 20 women (aged 18 years and over) who have experienced coercive control, intimate abuse and family violence from CALD backgrounds, and five focus groups with selected interview participants who choose to participate.

Significance

With increasing rates and devastating impacts on individuals, families and communities in Australia, the issue of intimate abuse and family violence is a pressing social and community issue that the Finding Metis book project is directly attempting to address. Research shows that CALD and minority women experience higher rates of intimate abuse and more barriers to accessing support services than non-CALD women. By drawing from the stories and lived experiences of CALD and minority women who have experienced and lived with intimate abuse and domestic and family violence, the book aims to provide strength-based resources and practical responses and tools for victims and survivors of intimate abuse and family violence as well as to provide more culturally sensitive and appropriate information that will better inform service providers, the community and the general public of these issues.

Project start date

May 2020

Expected completion date

November 2022
Back to top