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Research

Our research

Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

News and events

ANROWS hosts events as part of its knowledge transfer and exchange work, including public lectures, workshops and research launches. Details of upcoming ANROWS activities and news are available from the list on the right.

ANROWS

About ANROWS

ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Resources

To support the take-up of evidence, ANROWS offers a range of resources developed from research to support practitioners and policy-makers in delivering evidence-based interventions.


EXTERNALLY FUNDED RESEARCH PROJECTS

ESTIE: Evidence to support Safe & Together implementation and evaluation

Background

The ESTIE project is an action research study that builds on the foundations of previous projects with the Safe & Together Institute, government departments in New South Wales and the University of Melbourne research team led by Professor Cathy Humphreys.
Using an action research and capacity-building model, the ESTIE project will explore how problems relating to drug and alcohol use and mental health issues are used to exacerbate the tactics of power and control that can be deployed against victims and survivors. The project will also investigate how practitioners can integrate this knowledge and understanding into their practice.

Aim

This project aims to evaluate the capacity-building community of practice approach in NSW Health services in four localities to develop best practice all-of-family work where DFV co-occurs with parental substance use and/or mental health issues. It will use a practice-led research approach to build the evidence base in this area.

Methods

This project involves:
- practice-led research through ethnographic note-taking of community of practice discussions
- pre- and post-case assessment of case file documentation
- surveys and focus groups with research participants
- online survey of clients of community of practice members.

Significance

The project will enable trained and experienced practitioners, their managers and their organisations to better promote the safety of victims and survivors of DFV in contexts where DFV co-occurs with parental substance use and/or mental health issues. The project will also potentially develop a model of training and coaching that is effective in integrating an understanding of these issues into practice, organisational policy and procedures, leading to better collaboration at all levels between service providers and across the system as a whole. As a result of these changes, it is anticipated that clients – that is, all members of affected families – will receive a service that promotes the safety of all, and holds perpetrators accountable.

Funding Body

NSW Ministry of Health

Funding Budget

$377,138

Project start date

August 2020

Expected completion date

September 2022
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