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Research

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Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Knowledge transfer and exchange

ANROWS host activities as part of its knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) work, including public lectures, workshops and research launches. Details of upcoming ANROWS activities and news are available from the list on the right.

ANROWS

About ANROWS

ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Knowledge translation resources

To support the take-up of evidence, ANROWS offers a range of resources developed from research to support practitioners and policy-makers in delivering evidence-based interventions.


PI.17.12

Engaging men:
Invitational-narrative approaches

Completed
October 2019


Summary and method

This qualitative study explored how invitational narrative ways of working successfully engage men and enable behavioural and attitudinal change. The study explored the historical and philosophical foundations of invitational narrative practice, and the principles and skills that practitioners use in their work.

The study was conducted in partnership with Uniting Communities in Adelaide and involved two stages. Stage 1 comprised a literature review and interviews with 7 experts in the field of invitational narrative approaches in South Australia. Stage 2 comprised interviews with men who use violence, with each man’s invitational narrative practitioner, and (where consent was obtained) with each man’s partner/ex-partner. In total there were 6 dyads (man and practitioner) and 5 triads (man, practitioner, and ex/partner).

Outcomes

Project outcomes provided greater understanding of the therapeutic and service delivery practices that lead men to engage with, or disengage from programs. Specifically the findings contributed to the growing understanding of key values and principles of invitational narrative ways of working that support engagement and enable change when working with men who use violence in their intimate partner relationships.


Researchers

Project Lead

Professor Sarah Wendt, Flinders University

Research expertise

Dr Kate Seymour, Flinders University

Dr Fiona Buchanan, University of South Australia

Dr Natalie Greenland, University of South Australia, Uniting Communities

Practitioner expertise

Mr Chris Dolman, Emerging Minds & Uniting Communities


Downloads

RESEARCH REPORT

Engaging men who use violence: Invitational narrative approaches

Download

RESEARCH SUMMARY

Engaging men who use violence: Invitational narrative approaches. Key findings and future directions

Download
see also

PODCAST

How do we engage men who use violence?

View more

Presentations

Symposium:
Engaging men who use violence: Invitational narrative approaches



ANROWS, in partnership with Flinders University and Uniting Communities, hosted a symposium for policy-makers and practitioners on invitational narrative approaches to engaging men who use violence.

The symposium explored the key findings of the ANROWS research project, ‘Engaging men who use violence: Invitational narrative approaches’, led by Professor Sarah Wendt. This qualitative study analysed how invitational narrative ways of working can successfully engage men who use violence and enable behavioural and attitudinal change.

In this video we hear from researchers, practitioners and policy-makers on invitational narrative concepts, how invitational narrative ideas are used in practice to create change that is self-generated and personally meaningful, and the implications for policy and practice.

This symposium was held on the land of the Kaurna people of the Adelaide Plains.

Caution: Some people may find parts of this content confronting or distressing. Recommended support services include: 1800 RESPECT – 1800 737 732 and Lifeline – 13 11 14.

 

DOWNLOAD POWERPOINT

Symposium sessions

These videos breakdown the Engaging men who use violence symposium, into individual sessions.

This symposium was held on the land of the Kaurna people of the Adelaide Plains.

Caution: Some people may find parts of this content confronting or distressing. Recommended support services include: 1800 RESPECT – 1800 737 732 and Lifeline – 13 11 14.


Overview and key findings: Engaging men who use violence – Invitational narrative approaches

In this video we hear from the project lead, Professor Sarah Wendt, who offers an overview and key findings of the ANROWS research project. Sarah discusses:

  • the background of the research project
  • INA, and how it seeks to create change that is self-generated, personally meaningful, and sustainable
  • the strength of INA, and its capacity to engage men who use violence through curious inquiry, articulation of “ethical preferences”,  identifying what restrains participants from living in accordance with their ethical preferences, and creating an environment in which men can experience their shame
  • INA’s unrelenting focus on women’s and children’s safety and on men’s accountability to others.

How invitational narrative ideas are used in practice

In this video we hear from project researcher Kate Seymour, who presents responses to INA from participants in the ANROWS research project, Engaging men who use violence: Invitational narrative approaches.

Kate offers analysis of quotes from men who use violence engaged in INA, the men’s partners, and the practitioner working with them, exploring how INAs are enabling behavioural and attitudinal change. Kate closes with a small group exercise.


Panel: Implications of invitational narrative approaches for policy

In this video, Vanessa Swan and Fiona Mort sit down with research lead Professor Sarah Wendt to discuss the implications for policy of the research and the challenges involved in creating and funding programs when large-scale studies of program outcomes are limited.

Panel: Implications of invitational narrative approaches for practice

Practitioners Regina Newchurch and Chris Dolman sit down with research lead Professor Sarah Wendt to discuss the implications for practice of the research, and the realities on the ground with working with men and young people who use violence.

Budget

$93,080

Funded by Commonwealth Department of Social Services.

find out more

Contact ANROWS

PO Box Q389, Queen Victoria Building NSW 1230
Phone: 61 2 8374 4000
| Email: enquiries@anrows.org.au

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