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Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

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ANROWS hosts events as part of its knowledge transfer and exchange work, including public lectures, workshops and research launches. Details of upcoming ANROWS activities and news are available from the list on the right.

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ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

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To support the take-up of evidence, ANROWS offers a range of resources developed from research to support practitioners and policy-makers in delivering evidence-based interventions.


EXTERNALLY FUNDED RESEARCH PROJECTS

Australian nurses’ and midwives’ experiences of providing abortion care to women in the context of domestic violence or sexual assault

Background

The research project was designed to explore Australian nurses' and midwives' experiences when providing abortion care to people in the context of gender-based violence. It is a feminist project and the research team proposed that they will create research that is beneficial to women. It is aligned with 1) the postmodern paradigm, which emphasises bringing the "other" into the research process and empowering oppressed groups; and 2) the constructivist worldview, which assumes that knowledge and research are constructed from the personal, cultural and historical experiences of the participants and the researcher. It is a simultaneous multiple methods qualitative study using constructivist grounded theory and situational analysis methodologies.

Aim

This study has two aims:
1. to develop a substantive theory that explains the process by which Australian nurses provide abortion care to women who present in the context of domestic violence or sexual assault
2. to map the elements of the broader situation that affect the provision of nursing and midwifery care for women who present for abortion-related services in the context of domestic violence and sexual assault.

Methods

This project will use constructivist grounded theory (phase A) and situational analysis (phase B).

Significance

Nurses and midwives who provide abortion-related care are uniquely positioned to support women affected by violence. Yet, care within the context of abortion and violence is not well understood. To enhance service provision for women affected by violence, key stakeholders such as policymakers, educators and abortion service providers must understand how nurses provide nursing care to these women. This qualitative study aims to bridge this knowledge gap. There are four major benefits of this project. Firstly, nurses and midwives who provide abortion-related care, and who are often overlooked in the literature, will have an opportunity to provide insight into their role. Secondly, the study will shed light on the broader clinical situation that affects the practitioners' experiences. This information will then be available to stakeholders, such as educators and service providers to guide policy and practice and support requirements for nurses. Thirdly, the findings of this study may be used to improve support for women affected by domestic violence and sexual assault by informing health policy, nursing guidelines and nursing curricula. Finally, this study will add to the body of literature around abortion and violence and may contribute to informing abortion law reform discourse and debate.

Funding Body

Australian Government Research Training Program

Project start date

February 2019

Expected completion date

January 2023
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