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Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

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ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

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Further examination of the burden of disease
Posted in News

Further examination of the burden of disease

Wednesday, 23rd November 2016


On November 1, ANROWS released new calculations on the impact of intimate partner violence on the women’s health.

Led by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, our Burden of Disease study measures both fatal and non-fatal health impacts of intimate partner violence. 

A key strength of the study is that it provides, for the first time in the world, estimates of the burden of disease of intimate partner violence that include emotional abuse. Although data was only available for emotional abuse in cohabiting relationships, these new estimates are a significant addition to the evidence base as they align more fully with definitions of intimate partner violence increasingly being used in policy, practice and the law. 

The researchers completed calculations using a range of definitions of intimate partner. These additional estimates allow policy makers and advocates to have data to hand that matches the definition of intimate partner that they are using in their work.  

For example, the study found that:

•         Using a broad definition of intimate partner (physical and sexual violence by a cohabiting or non-cohabiting partner, as well as emotional abuse by a cohabiting partner):
           o   for women aged 18-44 years intimate partner violence was the leading cause of disease burden. 
           o   for all adult women (18+) intimate partner violence was the 7th leading cause of disease burden.

•         Using a narrower definition of intimate partner (physical and sexual violence by a cohabiting partner only):
           o   for women aged 18-44 years intimate partner violence was the second leading cause of disease burden. 
           o   for all adult women (18+) intimate partner violence was the 9th leading cause of disease burden.

If you are interested in how the burden of disease calculations were done, ANROWS and AIHW invite you to participate in an online webinar on 30 November on the methods that underpin the national burden of disease study examining the impact of violence against women project. 

The webinar will include a presentation by Dr Lynelle Moon from the AIHW, who was the Principal Chief Investigator for the project. The webinar will focus on the methodology used to produce the detailed estimates of the health burden due to exposure to intimate partner violence, and will allow participants to ask questions.

Webinar details  

Speaker: Dr Lynelle Moon, Senior Executive, Health Group, AIHW
Date: Wednesday, 30 November 2016
Time: 12:30pm-2:00pm (AEDT)
Cost: FREE

To register your interest, please email burdenofdisease@aihw.gov.au and the login instructions will be sent to you.



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