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Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

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ANROWS host events as part of its knowledge translation and exchange work, including public lectures, workshops and research launches. Details of upcoming ANROWS, and stakeholder events, along with sector news is available from the list on the right.

ANROWS

About ANROWS

ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

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Resources

To support the take-up of evidence, ANROWS offers a range of resources developed from research to support practitioners and policy-makers in delivering evidence-based interventions.

ANROWS

Parenting

Webinar: Parenting in contexts of family violence and inter-parental conflict: Implications for practice

  • 11:30 am - 12:30 pm, Wednesday, 14th March 2018

Presenters: Cathy Humphreys and Kathryn Lyons

Wednesday, 14 March 2018, 11:30–12:30pm AEDT.

This webinar will explore the implications of recent research on women’s and children’s experiences of family violence and inter-parental conflict.

Recent research led by Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS) found that both domestic and family violence (DFV) and inter-parental conflict (IPC) have a range of negative consequences for families and children, including increased parenting difficulties. It revealed that DFV and IPC are relatively common in Australian families, including separating families:

  • One in 4 mothers reported past or emerging IPC, with 8–9% reporting persistent IPC; and
  • One in 4 mothers in separated families reported physical harm before separation (compared to 1 in 6 fathers).

In families where mothers experienced IPC, children were more likely to have poorer physical health, poorer socio-emotional adjustment and lower academic achievement. Similarly, DFV was closely associated with poorer parent–child relationships.

This webinar will explore the impacts of DFV and IPC on parenting capacity and children’s social and emotional wellbeing. It will discuss implications for practice, including the need to develop responses that restore parenting capacity and repair parent–child relationships.

This webinar is presented in collaboration with ANROWS and the Family Law Pathways Network of Greater Melbourne.

Register to attend the webinar here.

 

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