Feeling unsafe? Find support services   emergency? call 000

SEARCH ANROWS.ORG.AU i

What are you looking for?

Research

Our research

Violence against women and their children affects everybody. It impacts on the health, wellbeing and safety of a significant proportion of Australians throughout all states and territories and places an enormous burden on the nation’s economy across family and community services, health and hospitals, income-support and criminal justice systems.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Knowledge translation and exchange

ANROWS host activities as part of its knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) work, including public lectures, workshops and research launches. Details of upcoming ANROWS activities and news are available from the list on the right.

ANROWS

About ANROWS

ANROWS was established by the Commonwealth and all state and territory governments of Australia to produce, disseminate and assist in applying evidence for policy and practice addressing violence against women and their children.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

Knowledge translation resources

To support the take-up of evidence, ANROWS offers a range of resources developed from research to support practitioners and policy-makers in delivering evidence-based interventions.

Seminar: Transforming legal understandings of intimate partner violence

Seminar: Transforming legal understandings of intimate partner violence

  • 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm, Friday, 28th June 2019 - Friday, 28th June 2019
  • Francis Burt Law Chambers. Level 25, 77 St George’s Terrace, Perth, WA

ANROWS, The University of Western Australia and research partners hosted a seminar that explored the findings and implications of the research report: Transforming legal understandings of intimate partner violence (IPV).

This report examines homicide trials in which self-defence is raised by women who have killed an abusive intimate partner.

The seminar explored how legal professionals and experts understand IPV, influencing which facts are selected and presented as relevant and the meaning that is made of those facts. It was suggested that using social entrapment as a conceptual framework for understanding IPV provides a more accurate and complete picture of facts involving IPV and therefore a proper foundation for assessing whether a defendant was acting in self-defence.

Who was this event aimed at?
  • Criminal lawyers (defence lawyers and prosecutors),
  • family lawyers,
  • judicial officers,
  • expert witnesses in matters involving family and domestic violence, and
  • family violence workers,
Speakers:
  • Professor Julia Tolmie, Faculty of Law, The University of Auckland.
  • Associate Professor Stella Tarrant, Law School, The University of Western Australia.
  • George Giudice, legal counsel for Dr Chamari Liyanage.

This was a free event.

Subscribe.

Subscribe to receive future Notepad
editions directly to your inbox

KEEP UP TO DATE WITH ALL OUR EVENTS

Subscribe to have updates delivered to your inbox.

Register for this event

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Back to top